Physical Theatre

During our workshops, I usually include some form of ‘physical theatre’. This is of course a broad term and creating theatre in general tends to be physical. However, the use of mask means we need to exaggerate movements much more to express an idea.

Book your workshops

https://manchestertheatreacademy.co.uk/childrens-drama-groups/

https://manchestertheatreacademy.co.uk/youth-drama-groups/

A few years ago, I did a teacher training workshop with ‘Frantic Assembly’ and found it so liberating. I’d seen the results of this method, when I watched ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night’ and was hooked.

This to me is physical theatre on a completely new level and I came out of the Dancehouse theatre in Manchester, feeling like I’d had a full body workout-I’d used muscles I didn’t even know I had-I was inspired and fell in love with theatre all over again. This felt new and edgy and I wanted to get stuck in with my group and pass this feeling on.

Since then we’ve done duets together, we’ve used the physical warm ups, we’ve increased our use of lifts an d always try and incorporate stylised moves, where they work, within our shows.

Frantic Assembly have some amazing stuff on their website at the moment and will be covering one of their shows as a theme each week. This week was A ‘Beautiful Burnout’ and I would really recommend checking this out. It gets you moving, creating and gives you a challenge to work on during these times. It’s important to stay active and keep your spark going, so do your drama challenges…do some physical theatre.

https://www.franticassembly.co.uk/frantic-digital

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *